ALBUM REVIEW


Monolith Cocktail - Nive & The Deer Children

Nive Nielsen And The Deer Children ‘Feet First’
Released by Glitterhouse , 5th February 2016

A trace on the sand, tiptoe, in the desert, child of the steps, and army of a 1000 men, tiptoe, marching as a block through the hazy smoky air, the lizards are undisturbed by the howling giants: Nive Nielsen appears here as nomadic child, an hybrid creature, leading, aloof to men’s lament, a troop of renegade legionnaires. The stars are far above and the night is frozen, and the voice bounces on the icy landscape as sharp as little drops of crystal, the music is raw and pure in its vigor.

They march singing, dancing, all night, climbing on the line that separates the ground from the sky; we, as listeners, may detach our acute emotions abruptly from our heart before gracefully falling back on the ground. She, Nive, and her orchestra take care of picking us up. She says, “Days will come and will calm down again” and without a word we believe her, rest in calm, obey the rhythm and mix. It is a whole world here.

The electric blue of the horizon comes out as sounds, oriental melodies swirl around us like the snake of fairy tales, a grandiose mixture of instruments, electric guitars mingles with trumpets, contrabass, echoes, reverbs, in a solitary place where humble souls come for a rest. The wild things are perched on the highest trees, on the freshest night of a glorious day.

The music belongs to that of a wild white wolf turned human to observe, at the edge of our world what it means to be us. It paints, hypnotic the portraits of mortals, before running back into the wild, befriended by an extraordinary orchestra, powerful and strong. Nive and the deer children are not one, they honor each other in the creation of a vision: A voyage in the wild, at heart, or all the things, from dawn till dusk.

There is no return possible, the passage in the twilights has blurred the path behind, a whisper has deleted it all, but the departure is done with a smile, mysterious and worrisomely enchanting.



Words: Ayfer Simms



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