Quarterly Playlist 2018: Part Two: Choice tracks from the last three months.





Welcome to part two of the Monolith Cocktail’s carefully selected and put-together quarterly playlist revue of 2018. Featuring an eclectic mix of ‘choice’ new music, re-releases and recently dug-out nuggets, all released in the last three months of the year, the blog’s staff (well me, Dominic Valvona, and our resident hip-hop fanatic Matt Oliver) have, as usual, produced a lively, sometimes meditative, at times distressed and harrowing, playlist.

Twisted dark arts sit next to cosmic sounds from the Maghreb; peregrinations flow into more steely razor sharp post-punk; and key hip-hop pontifications go hand-in-hand with shoegaze and the psychedelic. But as always, the musical flow will take you to all the most interesting locations, and hopefully introduce you to something you’ve never heard before.


Tracklist in full:


London Plane  ‘New York Howl’  Review
Josh T. Pearson  ‘Straight To The Top!’  Review
The Seven Ups  ‘Stampede’
Homeboy Sandman & Edan  ‘#NeverUseTheInternetAgain’  Review
Lee Scott & Jazz T  ‘What If Lee Was A Super Dope Rapper In 1988?’  Review
The Nonce  ‘Chocolate Cake’  Review
Warmduscher  ‘Standing On The Corner’
Samba Toure  ‘Yefara’  Review
The Turbans  ‘Zawi’  Review
David Dor  ‘Sapri Tama’
Hany Mehanna  ‘Mouna’
Bernard Estardy  ‘La Route Au Tabac’
The Magic City Trio  ‘Black Dog Following Me’  Review
Grimm Grimm  ‘Still Smiling’ Review
Black Light white Light  ‘Forward Backwards’  Review
Matt Finucane  ‘Damn Storyteller’  Review
Canshaker Pi  ‘Pressure From Above’
Ammar 808  ‘Bognga & Sandia’  Review
Shimshon Miel  ‘Amsterdam Experience’
The Mauskovic Dance Band  ‘The Opposite’
Black Thought  ‘9th vs. Thought’  Review
Pan Amsterdam  ‘The Lotion Song’  Review
Del The Funky Homosapien  ‘Humble Pie’  Review
Brownout  ‘Don’t Believe The Hype’
Dr. Octagon  ‘Operation Zero’  Review
Sad Man  ‘Parrot’  Review
Yonatan Gat  ‘Projections’  Review
Die Wilde Jagd  ‘2000 Elefanten’  Review
Elefant  ‘Norsun Muisti’  Review
Lucy Leave  ‘Look//Listen’  Review
Bas Jan  ‘Argument’
Sudan Archives  ‘Pay Attention’
Georgia Greene  ‘Lonely For You’
Evil Bone  ‘In Vain’  Review
The Bordellos  ‘Fading Honey’  Feat
Anton Barbeau  ‘Secretion Of The Wafer’  Review
Catrin Finch & Seckou Keita  ‘Cofiwch Dryweryn’  Review
Thomas Nation  ‘Hold My World’  Review
The Lancashire Hustlers  ‘Consider Me’  Review
Alex Stolze  ‘Way Out’  Review
Crayola Lectern  ‘Rescue Mission’
Tanzania Albinism Collective  ‘Albino’
Spiritualized  ‘A Perfect Miracle’

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REVIEW: DOMINIC VALVONA




Josh T. Pearson   ‘The Straight Hits’    Mute,  13th April  2018

Changing his tune (literally) Josh T. Pearson, the lonesome blues Texan with a wagonload of baggage, heads out on to the range with a swag bag of more joyful, unencumbered ‘golden hits’ on his latest album for Mute Records.

Rather ironic for an artist who despite writing and recording for decades has only one previous solo album to his name (2011’s agonizing confessional Last Of The Country Gentlemen), The Straight Hits feels like a ‘best of’ songbook.

Leaving behind the more apocalyptic gospel concepts of his work with the short-lived but acclaimed Lift To Experience, whose 2001 masterpiece The Texas Jerusalem Crossroads left such an indelible mark on the dirty country and Americana blues scenes, Pearson sets himself new parameters; adhering to a five-point rules system for transforming a “batch of tunes” he’d been working on for a decade. Earmarked originally for the ‘unrecorded’ Bird Songs album, the nine original songs on The Straight Hits are a lighter and as the title suggests ‘straighter’ attempt to change the mood.

Though just as heavy reference wise to the faith, obsessions, cruelties and power of love, Pearson has overcome the all-too real addictions and the collapse of his marriage to fire-off a distilled, riff heavy version of cowboy romance. Motivated recently to share more (“before it’s too late”), an epiphany of a sort sparked by the divisions of the 2016 US elections moved him to question if it was better to spread joy then mope and spread more anger. But it was whilst reading (as you do) the 14th century epic poem The Conference Of The Birds by Attar of Nishapur that Pearson muses, finally turned on the creative tap and helped ease this songbook’s passage.





Far from set in stone – the unwritten rock’n’roll law that all rules are written to be broken is invoked on the tender yearning A Love Song (Set Me Straight) – each song must at least try to follow Pearson’s self-imposed requirements: Number one, all songs must have a verse, a chorus and a bridge; two, the lyrics must run sixteen lines or less; three, they must have the word ‘straight’ in the title; four, that title must be four words or less; and five, they must submit to song above all else i.e. “You do as she tells you, whatever the song tells you”, “You bend to her, and not her to you.”

This probably cuts the fat, indulgence certainly, and makes for a more dynamic sound; especially on the alternative sports anthem opener Straight To The Top! – A pumped-up straight chaser, straight out the gate explosion of country slurred rock and gospel that sounds like Jeff Buckley at the rodeo. Conceived as the sort of fired-up soundtrack Pearson would like to hear, though he says he’s no particular fan, at an American football game, as he prepares for a high-five celebration with his fellow fans. It’s a great start. A fucking great start actually; the faith amped up to match his evangelical bounce back from the precipice: “If you knock me down, I’m gonna rise again. Time after time, there’s no way you can win.”

Taking on a curled lip croon Pearson goes on to sing about interloping lovers on the kooky desert cosmic Straight At Me – playing with the analogies of the old west, and in particular the reservations, the protagonist of this song a native Indian – whilst he reimagines Richard Hell leading The Pretenders through the High Chaparral and bawdy salon piano sing-a-long on Give It To Me Straight. The travails of love are played out to a mix of these more rowdy new wave of Americana hits and more lonesome, serious laments; some of which have a touch of irony, such as the calmer acoustic resigned Damn Straight, the album’s sole cover – originally by the Austin singer/songwriter Jonathan Terrell -, the author of which pines over losing his girl to the seductive power of Nashville’s famous cowboy swooners and crooners. Namechecking a litany of country music legends (“Waylon, Willie and Merle”), the achy-breaky heart singer pines “How could you take her just like that?”, “How could she leave me for a man she don’t even know?”

The Straight Hits is a most rallying rodeo that gives the Americana soundtrack a much-needed kick-in-the-pants; the themes of love, whether it’s the analogical kind, ‘take me right now’ kind, or lamentable kind, enacted across a varied but blistering songbook. Rejecting the stimulants and his demons, Pearson choses the good ol’ fashioned power and redemptive spirit of gospel ye-ye and country rock’n’roll. And don’t it sound just mighty fine and swell!



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