ALBUM REVIEW  WORDS: DOMINIC VALVONA

 

Modulus III  ‘ST’  February 2018

 

Laden with experience, each individual member of the Modulus III trio has a worthy CV of solo and ensemble work under their belts. It’s no surprise that the Bristol traversers of Steve Reichism, Krautrock/Kosmische, free and futurist jazz have picked up a few tricks in their expansive adventures and scored or collaborated on soundtracks for the film, TV and games industry.

An eclectic bunch of individuals, playing alongside such diverse artists as Anna Calvi, Adrian Utley of Portishead fame, and Will Gregory’s Moog Ensemble, the Modulus III lineup of multi-instrumentalists Dan Moore, Drew Morgan and drummer Matt Brown channel many of these previous explorations and more on their self-titled debut LP.

 

Obviously talented and trained – Drew is a former contemporary classical student of the Royal Academy Of Music in London and dab hand at drawing abstract vistas and sound effects from the cello – the trio’s multi-textural improvisations are meant o be read, partially, as a reaction against ‘virtuosity for virtuosity’s sake’. A problem in the jazz community especially, much of the contemporary scene features abundant skills and technical approach, but is bereft of sparking innovation and excitement: Competent yet far from interesting or fresh. And so this live performance, broken up into three tracks, recorded in the trio’s hometown, sounds at times free of aloof intentions and indecipherable musical language. The signposts are all there all right, from Sun Ra to Popol Vuh; from Bitches Brew and IOW Festival 70 Miles Davis to UFO era Guru Guru. And that rich smorgasbord of influences can all be detected and heard within the perimeters of the opening Waiting For The Network suite alone, without mentioning the album’s other two equally well-traveled improvisations.

The synthesized meets cello, Fender Rhodes and an articulate constantly moving drum patter on each of the album’s cleverly played and spontaneous evolving and ever-developing performances. Building from a primordial soup of whale song, Kosmische wilderness and prog-rock sci-fi, that opening fifteen-minute adventure takes a Donny McCaslin like trip towards the celestial before working the stop/start drum shuffles and probes into a cyclonic trip-hop rhythm. A stained-glass implosion Rhodes piano interplays with a cranked-up generator and brassy cymbal reverberations as the track takes shape and ends on a ‘close encounters of the third kind’ atmospheric like dissipating climax.

Shorter in length but no less dense with ideas, Diego Says Hello is a track full of anticipation, as the trio scuttle and poke at a Sun Ra procession across a Balkans/Central European soundscape. A similar length, Joyce could just as easily evoke the Outback as the deserts of the Middle East, on what is a free form jazz crosses Steve Reich avant-garde classical voyage into the unknown – the instruments move more like a mist. Slinking and fizzling, lamenting and mysterious, this final amorphous interplay receives a round-of-applause; until this moment, you could forget there was even an audience present; such seems the Modulus III concentration and serious atmosphere.

Immersed rather then flittering on the fringes of each inspiration, Modulus III navigates their myriad of inspirations and influences with aplomb. Strapped in, ready to lock into each other’s intuitive nature, it’s hard to deny that this cosmic adventure in improvisation would sound a mess, or mere appropriation without that virtuoso talent the trio want to break free from. However technical, and dense with intricate musicianship, it may be, this is a most brilliant, atmospheric and expletory of recordings. DV




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Words: Dominic Valvona




Vukovar  ‘The Clockwork Dance’
4th August 2017

“Resistance is token. Commence the clockwork dance.”

Vukovar – a band name that signifies the abject horror of the Croatian City that saw one of the worst atrocities in the Balkan civil war implosion of the 90s – would, if you asked them, say they were frustrated and perturbed by the delays of releasing material, and the process, self-aggrandizement, of promotion.

However, the trio remains quite prolific, having already released three albums of spiraling blissful apocalyptic post-punk and discordant heavy Krautrock flavours since their inception in 2015. And now ahead of a fourth, Puritan, the group unveil a new single, The Clockwork Dance as an advance warning.

Waltzing with romantic anarchist melancholy towards the end times, the despondent outsiders ponder melodically in a swirling Gothic version of a Phil Spector backbeat, almost in a dream like stasis. Quietly anthemic and yet calmly settling, The Clockwork Dance evokes a rapturous OMD joining Echo & The Bunnyman and The The on Nero’s veranda, contemplating the futility of it all.

If like me, you love the group’s more melodious, bordering on cerebral pop, balance between broody and soaring shimmery majesty, and in particular the band’s baptism of fire debut Emperor (more specifically the tracks Koen Cohen K and The New World Order) then you’ll embrace this latest sublime lament.

 

The B-side as it were, is a live version of Quiet from the group’s second album Voyeurism, which acts as a showcase for the band’s darker, rowdy and raw form of performance and howling rage. Channeling The Birthday Party, Bauhaus and the shaman blues style of The Doors, Vukovar put the frighteners on the original; bending and stretching Quiet with a stalking trebly bass and bedeviled and bedraggled rock’n’roll punctuations, before playing out on a long extended fuzzy rippling electronic drone.

Following up on this year’s transmogrified covers album, Fornication, Vukovar’s fourth (and again, featuring a three syllable title) Puritan will be released on the 25th October 2017. If The Clockwork Dance is any indication, then I’m pretty excited at the prospect of what might be one of the year’s best releases.





Choice Playlist Revue
Words: Dominic Valvona
Selection: DV, Ayfer Simms and Matt Oliver




The inaugural quarterly revue of 2017 gathers together a faithful purview of the last three months of reviews and articles on the Monolith Cocktail. Myself, Matt Oliver and Ayfer Simms have chosen a mere smattering of our favourite music; featuring both tunes from albums/singles/EPs/collections we’ve reviewed or featured on the site and some we just never had the time to include.

As usual an ever-eclectic amorphous affair, with the most avant-garde pieces of music sitting in harmony with the most edgy hip-hop, Malian sand dunes blues alongside Belgium alternative rock’n’roll and psychedelic noodling, the first quarterly playlist of the year features The XX, Sentidor, Mauro Pawlowski, Baba Zula, Tamikrest, Emptyset, Your Old Droog, Likwuid, King Ayisoba and many more. A full tracklist is below, with links to relevant posts.


Tracklist:

The XX  ‘On Hold’
Austra  ‘We Were Alive’
Sentidor  “Pedreira (Quarry)’  Feature
Porter Ray (ft. Asian T, Rife)  ‘Waves’  Feature
Mauro Pawlowski  ‘In Starlight (We Must Be Alive)’  Review
Baba Zula (Dr.Das Mix)  ‘Iki Alem (Dub Version)’  Review
Baluji Shrivastav  ‘Dance Of Erzulie’   Review
Bargou 08  ‘Mamchout’  Review
Terakaft  ‘Djer Aman (Afriquoi Remix)’   Review
Dearly Beloved  ‘Who Wants To Know’  Review
Taos Humm  ‘RC’  Review
Dr.Chan  ‘Yannnnk$$$ (Life I$ Not Fun)’  Review
Rudy Trouve  ‘Torch’  Review
Irk Yste  ‘Wumpe’  Review
Mauro Pawlowski  ‘Men In Sheds Pt.1’  Review
Emptyset  ‘Border’ Review
Nick Blackos  ‘No Answer’ Review
Your Old Droog (ft. Edan, Wiki)  ‘Help’  Feature
Paul White and Danny Brown  ‘Lion’s Den’  Feature
Blue Orchids  ‘The Devil’s Answer’  Review
Alasdair Roberts (ft. Gordon Ferries)  ‘Caleno Custure Me’  Review
James McArthur & The Head Gardeners  ’14 Seconds’  Review
Piano Magic  ‘Attention To Life’  Review
Sankofa  ‘Into The Wild’  Feature
Delicate Steve  ‘Nightlife’  Review
Retoryka  ‘Right Up Your Street Pt.1’  Review
Clap Your Hands Say Yeah  ‘Down (Is Where I Want To Be)’  Review
Craig Finn  ‘Ninety Bucks’
Shadow  ‘Dreaming’
Tinariwen  ‘Oualahila ar Tesninam (Transglobal Underground Remix)’  Review
Animal Collective  ‘Kinda Bonkers’
Likwuid (Ft. 2 Hungry Bros)  ‘Illfayted’  Feature
Oddisee  ‘Digging Deep’  Feature
M-Dot (Ft. Camp Lo, Tribeca)  ‘True Lies’  Feature
Oh No (ft. Tristate)  ‘Showroom Floor’  Feature
Dope Knife  ‘Nothing To Lose’  Feature
King Ayisoba (Ft. Wanlov da Kubolor & Big Gad)  ‘Africa Needs Africa’
Tamikrest  ‘Erres Hin Atouan’  Review

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