Playlist: Dominic Valvona/Matt Oliver




I’ll be brief – less chat, more music please – as you want the goods, but the Quarterly Revue is our chance to pick out choice tracks to represent a three month period in the Monolith Cocktail’s output. New releases and the best of reissues plucked from the team – me, Dominic Valvona, Matt Oliver, Brian ‘Bordello’ Shea, Andrew C. Kidd and Gianluigi Marsibilio – rub shoulders in the most eclectic of playlists. The full track list is awesome, global and diverse and can be found below.



Tracklist in full: 

Abdesselem Damoussi & Nour Eddine ‘Sabaato Rijal’
Bassekou Kouyate & Ngoni Ba (Ft. Abdoulaye Diabate) ‘Fanga’
Foals ‘Cafe D’Athens’
Kel Assouf ‘Tenere’
Deep Cut ‘Sharp Tongues’
Royal Trux ‘Suburban Junky Lady’
Ifriqiyya Electrique ‘Mashee Kooka’
39 Clocks ‘Psycho Beat’
The Proper Ornaments ‘Crepuscular Child’
Swazi Gold ‘Free Nelly’
Eerie Wanda ‘Magnetic Woman’
Julia Meijer ‘Fall Into Place’
Mozes And The Firstborn (Ft. PANGEA) ‘Dadcore’
Lite Storm ‘People (Let It Go Now)’
Downstroke & Gee Bag ‘Ooh My My My’
Errol Dunkley ‘Satisfaction’
Old Paradice/Confucius MC/Morriarchi ‘Sunkissed’
Black Flower ‘Future Flora’
Santiago Cordoba ‘Red’
Dexter Story (Ft. Kibrom Birhane) ‘Bila’
Houssam Gania ‘Moulay Lhacham’
Garrett N. ‘Avant’
Sir Robert Orange Peel ‘I’ve Started So I’ll Finish’
Gunter Schickert ‘Wohin’
Defari & Evidence ‘Ackknowledgement’
Eddie Russ ‘The Lope Song’
Oh No & Madlib ‘Big Whips’
CZARFACE & Ghostface ‘Mongolian Beef’
Greencryptoknight ‘Superman’
Choosey & Exile (Ft. Aloe Blacc) ‘Low Low’
Little Albert ‘Gucci Geng’
The KingDem ‘The Conversation (We Ain’t Done Yet)’
Wiki ‘Cheat Code’
Dear Euphoria ‘Push-Pull’
Tim Linghaus ‘Crossing Bornholmer (Reprise, Pt. II)’
Station 17 (Ft. Harald Grosskopf & Eberhard Kranemann) ‘…And Beyond’
Heyme ‘Noisz’
Clovvder ‘Solipsismo’
Ustad Saami ‘God Is’
Louis Jucker ‘Seagazer’
The Telescopes ‘Don’t Place Your Happiness In The Hands Of Another’
Blue House ‘Margate Jukebox’
Tempertwig ‘Apricot’
3 South & Banana ‘Magdalen Eye’
With Hidden Noise ‘The Other Korea’
Beauty Stab ‘O Eden’
Coldharbourstores ‘Something You Do Not Know’
Katie doherty & The Navigators ‘I’ll Go Out’
Mekons ‘How Many Stars?’
Graham Domain ‘Farewell Song’



Album Review: Gianluigi Marsibilio




Royal Trux ‘White Stuff’
(Fat Possum Records) 1st March 2019

An underground civilization always develops thanks to the tunnels, the galleries and the sedimenting of a tradition capable of not seeing the light, even for two decades.

The Royal Trux have returned, without great proclamations and arrogance to put themselves to the test with a music scene completely revolutionized since the early 90s, in fact today we cannot talk about ghosts and institutions like Kurt Cobain or Frank Zappa.

The duo from New York, even today, is able to immerse Dinosaur Jr. in a strange psychic substance; they bring out a work that manages to be a right counterbalance to the word underground. The underground is a wonderful place where you can appreciate the purest soul of things and also of the duo, which while not having the same success as other bands, such as White Stripes or related stuff, has maintained a coherence, which after 20 years we feel deep flowing like lymph in “White Stuff”.

The Royal Trux have maintained the avant-garde drive and the desire to be something else, completely different from whatever the word Rock means today, because even if important projects such as The War On Drugs, The National or others are easily indicated in one vein, the Royal Trux remain other, but not only in terms of sound, their choice is an aptitude that deeply distances the duo from any other band.

“Twin Infinities” (1990) could be a good problem, such a monumental work of historical impact, can lead to comparisons, further comparisons, but in the end an album like “White Stuff” also touches important peaks in songs, like “Sic Em Slow” or “Under Ice”. The psychedelic progression is preponderant in tracks like “Purple Audacity #2”, and the dreamlike wandering that lasted about 20 years offers a solid and iconic cue. The Royal Trux live on their mythical image that is not cumbersome, on the contrary it manages to be decadently fascinating.

Hagerty and Herrema show that they can complete themselves extensively, but above all they can make up for each other at the limits of the other, hiding personal and non personal smears and imperfections: it’s clear that the tumultuous journey that ended in 2001 is an example of what it means to complete, wander and start again.




Words: Gianluigi Marsibilio


Album Review: Gianluigi Marsibilio



Beirut ‘Gallipoli’
(4AD) 1st February 2019


A scratch in a forest of familiar sounds.

The new Beirut album is a freaky object, but in some details it revives the old fuses placed by the band on the battleground.

The shining of good past ideas is a necessary work to reaffirm the identity of the Beirut that are exalted in the Farfisa organ and in the galloping sections of winds, as in ‘Family Curse’.

This album follows in the footsteps of an album like March of the Zapotec, throwing us into an ocean of summer images, continental Europe still seen with an eye to the utopia of union. Zach Condon like Thomas More and his island of Utopia draws a world, even today, where contaminations flow and merge win on the walls, closures and fears.

Gallipoli is a bay where the Balkan folk, like Bregovic, can germinate and mix with the ideas of Condon, who uses a very similar instrumentation compared as to that of his previous masterpieces Gulag Orkestar and The Flying Club Cup.

Another peculiarity comes from the choice to capture the record in a fortress in Puglia (Italian region); to reflect by vibrations on the record are the walls of a castle that attaches Beirut not only towards geographical but also historical borders.

Overall, the work is able to light up in pieces like ‘Gallipoli’ or ‘When We Die’, but the feeling is of being in front of a rib, a sequence of the season and not a new and well focused chapter.

The danger of sound homogenization is strong, but with his head held high Condon’s ability to write songs on the thread of wool comes out, with a defined and precise register, a plot now well experienced by Beirut. To attenuate, however, the similarities of the work with the previous discography of the group there is the strong sound contamination that Gallipoli has suffered, while travelling in studios in Italy, Germany and New York.

The ukulele of the first works has disappeared, but the optimistic attitude of Beirut is reflected in background voices, in the raw keyboards and in the wind sections.

Gallipoli is a celebration of the talent of a musician with incredible ideas, so even if not everything is perfectly successful on the album, there is no room for disappointment, tracks like ‘When I Die’ or ‘I Giardini’ are worth it alone.



Words: Gianluigi Marsibilio


Album Review – Gianluigi Marsibilio 



La Rappresentante di Lista ‘Go Go Diva’
(Woodworm) December 14th 2019


In these years when music and art are more and more volatile, liquid, passing through Spotify and other media, La Rappresentante di Lista has made a bold album that touches you, crumples and turns on the incredible search for sounds, combined with the use of much necessary themes.

Go Go Diva is an album that draws from the perspective of a woman beyond the #MeToo movement; Go Go Diva is a disc-woman who speaks to the multitudes, with a disarming graciousness.

Some pieces of the album are really more courageous and necessary than the thousand articles published in the New York Times. The sound atmospheres are always sought after and, even on disc, theatrical, scenically beautiful and satisfying. The listener is transported to a land of irrational alienation, where every brilliant preconception is mixed up and merged.

La Rappresentante di Lista therefore does something very rare for a contemporary artist, it makes us think: the album leads us on a journey, free from any ideology but which narrates the being, the essence.

The path of the album follows, in some passages, the work in poetry of Ursula Andkjær Olsen. In one of the passages from her collection, released in 2018, entitled Third-Millennium Heart, the author says: “The heart could be a castle, for instance. You can jump from level to level very fast. The architectural words are very important in naming the body”.  The heart of the album is like a multi-layered castle made of architectures of words and bodies. It is a good way to represent the intentions and sounds of Go Go Diva, which is an architectural album, to be admired in detail and as a whole.

The record lives and dies in every piece. Go Go Diva has a variety of shapes, an incredible number of cartridges to shoot.

From ‘Questo Corpo’ to ‘Glória’ the sound vocabulary is absolutely heterogeneous and feeds a bit of all tastes, but above all shows how over the years this project is growing under the search for a complete and deep eclecticism. Each song is able to shoot the cards, for example ‘Poveri Noi’ comes as a storm in the track list and just this jolt in the atmosphere of every theme touched upon, from pregnancy to being a young woman, a new depth.

The potential of this album will be expressed in a live certainly suitable for strong entities: where thoughts, feelings and noises can be mixed into a single body.

Go Go Diva is a scream, an immersion, a promise, a hope to be grasped.






Words – Gianluigi Marsibilio 

Gianluigi Marsibilio’s Weekly Post Playlist





We’re back with our beloved weekly playlist. For this return I decided to bring you many beautiful new releases.

A cut above all and all there is, the featured track from Any Other we have to report is one of the most beautiful pieces from the Two, Geography album: a rare gem to be discovered absolutely.

Not only young discoveries like Any Other or TENUE but also absolute confirmations like the Low, who have produced a complex album, deep and able to reach the unreachable peaks for most of the bands in activity, a disk from low, but definitely not low-profile.

On the playlist we also share with you a more acoustic choice from Riccardo Sinigallia, singer-songwriter of the great Italian tradition who manages to combine wonderful texts, a coefficient of experimentation, always right and weighted.

The climax of the weekly point is a track from the Aphex Twin new Collapse EP; there is no need to say anything about a job of this kind perfectly pigeonholed in what is a unique project, visionary, music that goes beyond the common feeling.

 

Gianluigi Marsibilio



Live Festival Report/Words: Gianluigi Marsibilio




The Todays Festival has been over for a few days now but the feeling that, musically, it was such a rare festival continues to invade me.

I was in incognita at the festival, I had decided not to write about it, talk about it, but some things have given some hope in me, not only musically speaking, but humanly, because the Turin festival could be seen as a human experience of sharing.

The only flaw was to have left my sweet umbrella at security checks.

Now I will try to explain in short some live acts that left me speechless.

 

Bud Spencer Blues Explosion

An ancient spirituality which re-emerges between the magic and the Sanpietrini (typical Rome street paving) and burns in the harder and harder blues that can be brought to a stage in 2018.

Adriano and Claudio are a cornerstone, a deep satisfaction both for the ears and the body.





King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard

Listening to them is tantamount to having a moment of ecstasy in a jungle. Psychedelic and precision meet in an unconventional live setting. The punctuality of the double battery is disarming, the setlist is organic and makes the live performance a riot that fully reflects the nature of the Australian band.

 

Colapesce

A breath of your soul always comes out of your body during and after a seeing a live Colapesce. His live performance in 2018 is unique, the whole set of sounds and moments of the concert perfectly designed to transport everyone to a parallel universe. If you want to find out what it means today to see the singer-songwriter in Italy and immerse yourself in a unique project, go to Spotify and look for Colapesce.

 

Maria Antonietta

Speech at times specular to that made for Colapesce is repeated with Marie Antoinette, who even voiceless and sick, can make a whispered, delicate and elegant impression live. Her songs are flowers, like those scattered on the stage. The tour could be considered as her total quality leap, at last, and the Todays enjoyed every little moment of it.



The War On Drugs


One of the most solid live shows seen in Italy in 2018, already successfully passed at the Fabrique in Milan, the Americans are rewriting the definition of rock with a little rock n ‘roll wisdom and caution.

Granduciel is an enlightened leader, of what will be a legendary band over time, with whom to confront. The concert slips under the cloudy sky of Turin and with a melancholy that sometimes invades us all, the War on Drugs make us understand why in 2018 it is worth going to enjoy the last moments of summer at a festival.



LP Review: Words: Gianluigi Marsibilio 



Ty Segall & White Fence ‘Joy’ (Drag City)

Disorder and progress. Joy is an album that embraces Ty Segall‘s psychedelia and White Fence’s potency within the enhanced framework of short and hard tracks. Songs that seem to test a space rocket, launch tests on a poetic platform, finding a peak of fleeting delirium.

Intentions are fully understood in songs such as ‘Body Behavior’, or, where those contrasts emerge between the song form and the small textual pearls that are drawn.

The storytelling of this work is strongly linked to productions like DRINKS or the Body/Head. The structure and thoughts of these pieces is inspired by bands like Palberta, which in the abstract research and in the fast songs, enhance their skills.

“Everyone makes grammar mistake”, Joy wants to wallow in these mistakes: teasingly. In a song that repeats ‘Hey Joel, where are you going with that?’ Hendrix takes over to play on the supposed death of rock.

The most concrete and poetic text of the album is in ‘A Nod’, where Segall sings: “Tried to please my mother/Tried to please my father/Tried to please everyone but me”, “My friends say I need money/My friends say I need followers/But I want to believe in me”.

The half-formed songs are an example of the continuous artistic flow of Ty Segall and Fence, who manage to remain attached to their creative activity with absolute incisiveness. Joy is a modus operandi of work and attitude to admire.

The use of pitch shifting and numerous slogans such as ‘Body Behavior’ or ‘Please Do Not Leave This Town’ leave a sense of the cyclonic and joyful: as in an eternal ride on a roller coaster.

In Joy, things come together and resume the thread of Hair, their first album collaborative album together, released in 2012. After a feast of a garage rock that still embellishes your session of listening, the closure of ‘My Friend’ is quite useless for the purpose of the album, but still remains a ballad slightly dreamy, pleasant to listen to.

A daring record for an expert and ready duo, an album made with craft and lo-fi attitude, a test that we cannot disdain and that exalts a historical collaboration.

Gianluigi Marsibilio 


Playlist: Selection and words: Gianluigi Marsibilio 




“No single birthplace of mankind, say scientists” so titled an article released this the week in “The Guardian” and in this Weekly Point it is equally impossible to research the origin of sound tracks and unique ideas like those of Generic Animal, Pippo Sowlo or Body/Head, the wonderful cross between Sonic Youth and Bill Nace.

Summer does not need half measures, but of winning certainties and bets: this is why we point out the Deafheaven and Laurel Halo, who make us dive into the most absolute quality thanks to their two opposing styles

There is a deep disconnection between the pieces, that perfectly matches with a continuous search for stylistic imperfection.

This week’s selection is not for those that Thoreau calls “Mere herds of men”: we are ready to disguise and divide you but also to amaze you with these 10 songs.

We want to challenge you with a series of moods and sounds that could be a summer anti-soundtrack.

Our Weekly Point is a journey, a series of questions that are not always able to be answered, but this is fine for us and we allow ourselves to be supported by these questions, and an infinitely complex.

To paraphrase a poem by Amy Lowell: “I do not want to flaunt the PLAYLIST. I only want to share it “.




Words/Selection: Gianluigi Marsibilio

Playlist: Selection and words: Gianluigi Marsibilio 




Gianluigi Marsibilio Weekly Playlist Report #1

All the best new record releases can be found on this new weekly Monolith Cocktail playlist. Everything is shaken with the right doses and we will let you discover the best pearls of the international music scene on a weekly basis. My name is Gianluigi Marsibilio and given my Italian origins, I will hopefully draw your attention to what is going on in my country musically.

The selection opens with the Murmurmur, super environmental rock and continues with pieces closely linked to the delicate and refined sound of the guitar.

Silky and hypnotic melodies intertwine and come to life in songs like Her’s.

These 15 tracks make sense if we can think and drag them into a world on the edge, underground and where the union and the mix of genres matches with creativity and cultural uniqueness.

In the fast burst intertwine pieces of prodigious and precocious artists such as Dusk and Bodega, we find authors of one of the best debuts in the history of contemporary Indian rock.

In a moment of absolute female renaissance, in which we can see the success of Soccer Mommy, Frankie Cosmos or Snail Mail, we point out Laura Jean Anderson and Clairo.

In the middle of the playlist I insert an all-Italian share with Mecna, one of the most eclectic of Italian rappers. I think a report like this is useful in understanding how, even the music of the tired European continent, is evolving towards new sounds.

See you next week. In the meantime tell us your thoughts and what you think of this edition’s weekly playlist.

Gianluigi Marsibilio


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